Maria Mitchell in Her Own Words

I posted this seven years ago in 2013 (how is that possible – seven years?!) but I thought it was interesting to repeat –and it ties to the July entry about her return to see the Airys many years later.

August 17{1857}

Today we have been to the far-famed British museum.  I carried as “open sesame” a paper given to me by Prof. Henry asking for me special attention from all societies with which the Smithsonian {is} connected . . . . The art of printing has brought us incalculable blessings, but as I looked at a neat manuscript book by Queen Elizabeth copied from another, as a present to her Father I could not help thinking that it was better than worsted work!

On August 2, 1857, Maria Mitchell and the young woman she was accompanying as a chaperone, Prudence Smith, arrived in Liverpool, England for their European tour.  Maria Mitchell’s “open sesame” was a letter of introduction – she went with several.  She would find that the doors were thrown open for America’s first woman astronomer – she was that well known in America and abroad.  She would become quite close to Sir George Airy, the British Astronomer Royal, and his wife Richarda, as well as the astronomical Herschel family.

JNLF

Maria Mitchell In Her Own Words

Thursday July 17. {1873}  Mr. Airy’s.  I went to Greenwich and arrived about 11 a.m.  I had for years had misgivings about Mrs. Airy but had heard nothing.  When the servant said “Lady Airy is not yet up” I knew she must be ill . . . Sir George Airy came in and the welcome was so hearty!

And later I saw Mrs. Airy wheeled out in a chair, a wreck and a ruin!  And so tenderly cared for by all!  She had been so good to me 15 years since, and was so full of vigor, that I could have cried at the sight. 

She appeared to be very glad to see me, but said nothing, continuing to hold my hand and  smile . . . . Sir George Airy, as he is now, had improved with age and looks strong and vigorous . . . .

As I have noted before, after meeting the Airys – Sir George Airy being the Astronomer Royal of England – Maria kept up a lifelong correspondence with them.  In particular, she developed a lifelong correspondence with Richarda Airy until this illness which I will assume was likely a stroke (without researching).

Maria was in Europe for her second trip – so she did see Europe once again unlike her journal entry I posted for June 1858.  She travelled to Europe with her sister, Phebe Mitchell Kendall, and Phebe’s husband, Joshua, and their son, William Mitchell “Willie” Kendall.  This would be the trip that brought Maria to Russia and the Observatory at Pulkova.

JNLF

Maria Mitchell In Her Own Words

November 1. {1857} There was, as there is very commonly in English society, some dresses too low for my taste, and the wine drinking was universal so that I had to make a special point of getting a glass of water and was afraid I might drink all there was on the table.  I think no one but Prudie and myself took a drop.  The servants stood in array just outside of the dining room door as we entered all in livery . . . Before the dessert came on, saucers were placed before each guest and a little rose water dipped from a silver basin into them, and then each guest washed his face . . . The gentleman next me Prof. {Robert} Willis, told me that it was a custom peculiar to Cambridge and dating from its earliest times.

Maria Was at Trinity College, Cambridge at the Master’s Lodge for dinner.  She was surrounded by numerous professors of the college and also some of her newly made English scientific friends such as the Airys.  Prudie (Prudence Swift) was the young woman Maria was chaperoning on a trip through Europe.

Her distaste for wine and low cut dresses was not just hers – it was also her American and Quaker upbringing.  While she would leave Quaker meeting long before this European trip – she left Quaker meeting in her early 20s as did all the Mitchell siblings – she maintained her Quaker lifestyle until her death.  Note too where her humor comes through a bit – by poking fun at the washing at the table.  Not the fingers mind you, the entire face.

JNLF

Maria Mitchell In Her Own Words

Edinburgh, Sept. 30 {1857}

My dear Father,

 . . . Nothing is more provoking than the ignorance of the English about Americans.  I really doubt if they would know who Benjamin Franklin was, if I should speak of him.  They are really too full of their own greatness to perceive that there is another great nation.  Mr. Airy understands that the Bonds are astronomers, but I dare say Mrs. Prof. Smyth never heard of them, tho’ of course Prof. Smyth has the transactions.  And yet, no observatory has such instruments as Harvard . . .

Despite the fact that the Bonds and the Harvard College Observatory really were among the best in the world, their counterparts in Europe barely knew them – o rat least barely acknowledged them.  Such a factor played a large role in how long it took for Maria to be recognized as indeed the discoverer of her comet in 1847.  The Bonds were among the first to photograph the stars and they entrusted Maria with such a glass plate photograph to bring on her trip to Europe.  She would give this plate to Sir George Airy on her visit to him.  Airy was the Astronomer Royal of England (Charles Piazzi Smyth was Scotland’s Astronomer Royal) and though her first impressions were somewhat strong as you have noted above, she would carry on  a lifelong friendship with Sir George Airy and his wife, Richarda.

JNLF

Maria Mitchell in Her Own Words

Maria MitchellAugust 17{1857}

Today we have been to the far-famed British museum. I carried as “open sesame” a paper given to me by Prof. Henry asking for me special attention from all societies with which the Smithsonian {is} connected . . . . The art of printing has brought us incalculable blessings, but as I looked at a neat manuscript book by Queen Elizabeth copied from another, as a present to her Father I could not help thinking that it was better than worsted work!

On August 2, 1857, Maria Mitchell and the young woman she was accompanying as a chaperone, Prudence Smith, arrived in Liverpool England for their European tour. Maria Mitchell’s “open sesame” was a letter of introduction – she went with several. She would find that the doors were thrown open for America’s first woman astronomer – she was that well known in America and abroad. She would become quite close to Sir George Airy, the British Astronomer Royal, and his wife Richarda, as well as the astronomical Herschel family.

JNLF